EMILY NEVES

actor. writer. director. teaching artist.

Photo by Amitava Sarkar.

Who Am I This Time (and other conundrums of love) Stages Theatre, 2017.
Photo by Jon Shapley.

Emily Neves is an actor, voice actor, writer, director, and teaching artist, based in Houston, Texas. She has delighted Houston audiences at the Tony-Award-winning Alley Theatre, where she spent seven seasons as a member of the Resident Acting Company; Stages Repertory Theatre; Classical Theatre Company; and The Hangar Theatre in Ithaca, NY.

Emily has performed in nearly forty plays in her ten years as a professional stage actor and has voiced more than 120 characters in English dubs of Japanese anime. Emily is also a director and ADR script writer for Sentai Filmworks and FUNimation Studios. Her short play, Pretty Little White Girls was featured as part of Mildred's Umbrella's Museum of Dysfunction VIII. Emily also works as a teaching artist for Applied Theatre at the Alley in the Staging STEM program, teaching STEM subjects through theatre curriculum.

MARIE ANTOINETE, 2014.
Photo by Bruce Bennett

Emily was born in Conroe, Texas, but quickly left, spending most of the first decade of her life living in such exotic locales as Douala, Cameroon; Tunis, Tunisia; Lisbon, Portugal; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, because of her father's job with Shell Oil. Her epic, storied childhood gives Emily a unique perspective on the world, and has influenced her work as an artist, both on and offstage.

Who Am I This Time (and other conundrums of love).
Photo by Jon Shapley.

Emily began studying acting when she was eleven years old, and was scouted by Page Parkes Modeling and Talent agency that same year. Emily spent the next four years as a print model and cleaned up at speech tournaments, as well, particularly in the solo prose category. Emily began taking private voice lessons at this time, and by the time she was fourteen, was a classically trained operatic soprano.

Emily Neves
Photo by Peter Ton

In high school, Emily was an active member of the prestigious choir program at James E. Taylor High School in Katy, Texas. She made the All-area choir and was a prolific musical theatre performer in those years. The THS Women's chorus was invited to sing at the TMEA convention in the spring of 2000, and Emily had the only student solo. Emily was voted Most Talented in her graduating class.

Emily Neves
Photo by Christine Sheeren

Emily decided to attend Texas State University in San Marcos, known at the time as Southwest Texas State. She earned scholarships from both the THS choir Parents' Association and the SWT School of Music. Emily began her college career in the Musical Theatre BFA program, but chose to focus on acting at the end of her freshman year. Emily was accepted into the prestigious BFA Acting program at the end of her sophomore year, having appeared on the Mainstage in The Medeas, by Jay Jennings, and Hay Fever, as bratty daughter Sorrel Bliss.

Marie Antoinette, 2014. Photo by Bruce Bennett. Set design by Ryan McGettigan. With Mitchell Greco as Luis and Leo Gosset as the Dauphin.
Photo by Bruce Bennett.

In her time at Texas State, Emily also appeared in Echoes; Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up; and Transposing Shakespeare, by John Fleming, for which she was nominated for the Irene Ryan acting competition at the Kennedy Center's American College Theatre Festival. She was also accepted into the Broadway Theatre Project in 2000 and 2001, where she studied under Ann Reinking, Ben Vereen, Julie Andrews, Patty Lupone, Gwen Verdon, Phylicia Rashad, and others, some of the most respected artists in the industry.

Gwen Verdon pulled Emily to the front of her class to demonstrate how one should move one's hips while dancing the merengue. Ann Reinking gave Emily a featured role in a dance number set to the Austin Powers theme song, that Ann herself directed. Emily had been goofing off during a break, and Anne liked what she saw. She put Emily front and center and let her goof off to her heart's delight.

Marie Antoinette 2014.
Photo by Amitava Sarkar.

Emily left Texas State in late 2003 and returned to Houston. In the summer of 2007, Emily saw an ad in the Houston Chronicle for an open call for actors at the Alley Theatre. She prepared a monologue from Miss Julie, by August Strindberg, and from that open call she got cast as Belle and Fred's wife in that year's production of A Christmas Carol. Early the following year, she was asked to understudy the Speaking Janis in Love, Janis on the Hubbard Stage. That summer, the Alley invited Emily to join the resident acting company. Over the next seven seasons at the Alley, Emily performed in nearly thirty plays. Memorable roles include: Esme/Alice in Rock N Roll, by Tom Stoppard; Pem Farnsworth in Aaron Sorkin's The Farnsworth Invention; Michael Darling in Peter Pan; Marilyn in A Behanding in Spokane, by Martin McDonagh; Lt. Cmdr Joanne Galloway in A Few Good Men, also by Aaron Sorkin; and many an exciting ensemble track.

Marie Antoinette 2014

In the fall of 2011, Emily returned to Texas State to complete her BFA in acting. She graduated with honors, having earned a 4.0 in all courses in those two semesters. While at Texas State, Emily directed a production of Harold Pinter's The Dumbwaiter as part of the Naked Truth One Act Play Festival to much acclaim. Emily also went to the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival as the acting partner to Angeliea Stark, a national finalist in the Irene Ryan acting scholarship competition.

Marie Antoinette.
Photo by Amitava Sarkar.

In the fall of 2012, Emily returned to Houston and the Alley Theatre. She performed in several plays over the next two seasons, then left the acting company in early 2014 to pursue other avenues. She became a full-time ADR director for Sentai Filmworks in March of 2014. In her six months there, she directed Love, Chunibyo, and Other Delusions; Watamote; Dog and Scissors; Rozen Maiden: Zurückspulen; and Maid Sama.

Marie Antoinette.
Photo by Bruce Bennett.

In the spring of 2014, she played Cecily Cardew in The Importance of Being Ernest at the Classical Theatre Company. At the end of the run, she received a call from Stages Repertory Theatre. Kenn McLaughlin had seen Emily as Cecily, and had become eager to work with her. Stages offered her the titular role in David Adjmi's Marie Antoinette, which she played to great acclaim under the superb direction of Leslie Swackhamer. In the spring of 2015 Kenn McLaughlin directed her as Nina in Stupid F**king Bird. Emily has since performed at Stages in the world premiere of Michele Riml's Miss Teen, and Who Am I This Time (and other conundrums of love).

Marie and the Revolutionary.
Photo by Bruce Bennett.

In early 2015, Emily became a staff writer for Five Foot Six Productions, adapting Japanese anime for American television through FUNimation Studios. She has also written for Sentai Filmworks. Credits include Yona of the Dawn, Snow White with the Red Hair, Fairy Tale: Zero, Trinity Seven, Planetarian, Hyouka, Masamune-kun's Revenge, Ushio and Tora, Classroom of the Elite, and more.

With David Matranga as Axel Fersen.
Photo by Amitava Sarkar

Recently, Emily traveled to Ithaca, New York, to play Phoebe in the world premiere of I Carry Your Heart, by Georgette Kelly, as part of Hope Onstage, the playwriting competition component of the Hope and Optimism Initiative.


The Hope and Optimism Initiative

Emily has appeared in several films, including Apart, The Kid, Patriot Act, MagCrew, and more.

In her limited spare time, Emily enjoys singing, songwriting, playing the guitar, drawing, painting, and photography. Fans may remember her brief turn on season four of American Idol in 2004, but hopefully not.

Look for Emily this season as she returns to the Alley Theatre. Stay Tuned for more updates by following Emily on Twitter, @EmilyNeves; Instagram, @emilymarieneves; and liking her Facebook Actor page, conveniently titled, Emily Neves. For booking information, contact Bob Blume at stepforwardentertaintment@gmail.com.

Marie.
Photo by Bruce Bennett.
Emily Neves
With Valentina Olarte and Precious Merenu. Photo by Troy Schulze.
Marie Antoinette at Stages

Marie Antoinette, by David Ajmi at Stages Repertory Theatre, 2014. Directed by Leslie Swackhamer. Photo by Amitava Sarkar.

Emily Neves Makes Queenly Leap to Stardom

As Nina in Stupid F**king Bird, Stages Repertory Theatre, 2015. Photo by Bruce Bennett.
"Emily Neves, so memorable earlier this season as Stages' 'Marie Antoinette,' is likewise ideal as the vulnerable, yearning, at times wrenchingly heartbroken Nina." -Everett Evans, Houston Chronicle.

As Gloria Hawkins in Boeing-Boeing at the Alley Theatre, 2010. Photo by John Olive.

As Alice Sycamore in You Can't Take it with You, Alley Theatre, 2013. Photo by Jann Whaley. "Emily Neves' Alice and Jay Sullivan's Tony Kirby make an absolutely adorable couple. Their onstage chemistry is perfect, which makes the love the characters feel for one another intoxicating. Moreover, Emily Neves brings vivid life to Alice's insecurities and fears about her seemingly crazy family, providing the second act with the appropriate high stakes. Individually, they offer strong performances that fascinate, but together Emily Neves and Jay Sullivan are beguiling and warm the hearts of the audience. It would be impossible not to root for their characters to have the happily ever after they long for." -David Clarke, BroadwayWorld.com

Still from the 2017 film Dropa. Photo by Larry McKee.

Emily Neves
With Valentina Olarte and Precious Merenu. Photo by Troy Schulze
Marie Antoinette at Stages

Marie Antoinette, by David Ajmi at Stages Repertory Theatre, 2014. Directed by Leslie Swackhamer. Photo by Amitava Sarkar

Emily Neves Makes Queenly Leap to Stardom

As Nina in Stupid F**king Bird, Stages Repertory Theatre, 2015. Photo by Bruce Bennett.
"Emily Neves, so memorable earlier this season as Stages' 'Marie Antoinette,' is likewise ideal as the vulnerable, yearning, at times wrenchingly heartbroken Nina." -Everett Evans, Houston Chronicle.

As Gloria Hawkins in Boeing-Boeing at the Alley Theatre, 2010. Photo by John Olive.

As Alice Sycamore in You Can't Take it with You, Alley Theatre, 2013. Photo by Jann Whaley. "Emily Neves' Alice and Jay Sullivan's Tony Kirby make an absolutely adorable couple. Their onstage chemistry is perfect, which makes the love the characters feel for one another intoxicating. Moreover, Emily Neves brings vivid life to Alice's insecurities and fears about her seemingly crazy family, providing the second act with the appropriate high stakes. Individually, they offer strong performances that fascinate, but together Emily Neves and Jay Sullivan are beguiling and warm the hearts of the audience. It would be impossible not to root for their characters to have the happily ever after they long for." -David Clarke, BroadwayWorld.com

Still from the 2017 film Patriot Act. Photo by Larry McKee.